Aboriginal Bush Foods and Medicine
Aboriginal Bush Foods and Medicine
Aboriginal Bush Foods and Medicine
Aboriginal Bush Foods and Medicine
Aboriginal Bush Foods and Medicine
Aboriginal Bush Foods and Medicine
Aboriginal Bush Foods and Medicine

Aboriginal Bush Foods and Medicine


Learn how Aboriginal people use bush plants for medicine and food.

Join the Tjapukai women for an insight into the ancient medicinal and culinary uses of native plants, fruits and seeds, which the Aboriginal people gathered. Learn how toxins are leached from poisonous rainforest plants and interesting facts like how flowers speak to you, telling you when the seasons will change and when it’s time to move hunting grounds.

The black bean and yellow walnut seeds must be roasted first before they are grated and then left in a dilly bag in running water. Each day the ladies check to make sure the poison is draining out. Then they grind it down to fine powder so they can make dough for bread.

There is no need to treat the fruit of the fig trees before you eat them. However, if you eat too many they may give you a belly ache. Once again the rainforest can be of assistance with the fruit of the brown apple tree reversing the effects of the fig.

Dance Theatre

Spear & Boomerang Throwing

Meet The Performers

Didgeridoo Show

Hunting & Weapons

Guided Bush Foods Walk

Bush Foods & Medicine

Aboriginal Bush Foods and Medicine